DIALOGUE

11 FEBRUARY 2019
NEW DELHI

Legal Empowerment and SDG 16

UNPACKING POLICY STORIES

Legal empowerment of the poor can be developed on the basis of labour rights, legal instruments for entrepreneurship, property rights and access to justice and rule of law. Sustainable Development Goal 16 calls to provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. 

School of Government and Public Policy, O. P. Jindal Global University

&

Policy Talks

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a dialogue with

Naresh Singh

International development adviser based in Canada, with a special focus on sustainable livelihoods and legal empowerment

Bibek Debroy

Chairman, Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister of India and Member, NITI Aayog

Ramaswamy Sudarshan

Moderator

Dean, School of Government and Public Policy, O. P. Jindal Global University

Governments have to backtrack the core elements of the rule of law from judiciary independence to accountability and fundamental human rights. 2030 agenda (SDGs) is to hard-wire the Human Rights based approach to development policy and practice.

- Dr Naresh Singh. (International development adviser based in Canada, with a special focus on sustainable livelihoods and legal empowerment) 

Read the complete speech and commentaries here

SUMMARY REPORT 

The Four Pillars of Legal Empowerment of the Poor

First Pillar: Access to Justice and The Rule of Law

Second Pillar: Property Rights

Third Pillar: Labour Rights

Fourth Pillar: Business Rights

Making the Law Work for everyone

Report of the Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor

Source: UNDP